Special Issue “100 Years of Chronogeometrodynamics: the Status of the Einstein’s Theory of Gravitation in Its Centennial Year” in the journal Universe

Dear Colleagues,

In 1692, Newton wrote: “That gravity should be innate inherent and essential to matter so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum without the mediation of anything else by and through which their action or force may be conveyed from one to another is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters any competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it. Gravity must be caused by an agent acting constantly according to certain laws, but whether this agent be material or immaterial is a question I have left to the consideration of my readers”. One of them who, just over 200 years later, picked up the baton of Newton was Albert Einstein. His General Theory of Relativity, which marks the centenary this year, opened up new windows on our comprehension of Nature, disclosed new, previously unpredictable, phenomena occurring when relative velocities dramatically change in intense gravitational fields reaching values close to the speed of light and, for the first time after millennia of speculations, put Cosmology on the firm grounds of empirically testable science. This Special Issue is dedicated to such a grandest achievement of the human thought.

Prof. Lorenzo Iorio
Prof. Stephon Alexander
Prof. Jean-Michel Alimi
Prof. Elias C. Vagenas
Guest Editors

Galaxies: Special Issue “Advances in Gravitational Research”

Dear Colleagues,

Gravitation is one of the known fundamental interactions shaping the fabric of the natural world. Although we have been familiar with it since the remote past, our knowledge of it is far less accurate than that of electromagnetism and of the nuclear interactions because of its comparatively feebler intensity. To date, the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) represents the best theoretical description of gravitation at our disposal. As such, GTR is one of the pillars of our knowledge of Nature; intense experimental and observational scrutiny is required not only to gain an ever-increasing confidence about it, but also to explore the borders of the realm of its validity at different regimes ranging from the shortest distances to extragalactic scales.
To this aim, a variety of different theoretical, experimental and observational approaches are required to extend the frontiers of our knowledge of the gravitational phenomena. What are the possibilities opened up by forthcoming space-based missions? What is the status of some long-lasting experimental endeavors aimed to test certain relativistic predictions? Are there some founded hopes to testing newly predicted gravitational effects in the near future in some suitable astronomical and astrophysical laboratories? Might observations collected in the past for various purposes hide some surprises? Do Earth-based laboratory experiments have nothing new to say about gravitation? What is the role of alternative models of the gravitational interaction? These are just some of the questions that the present special issue will try to address.

Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Iorio
Guest Editor

Manuscripts should be submitted online at http://www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form.

IJMPD: Gravitational Wave Detection and Fundamental Physics in Space

Dear Colleagues,

International Journal of Modern Physics D has published a new special issue on Gravitational Wave Detection and Fundamental Physics in Space [IJMPD Vol. 22, No. 1 (2013)].

Web address: http://www.worldscientific.com/toc/ijmpd/22/01
Visit and register with World Scientific website today to read the full text of these articles.

With best wishes,
Chee-Hok Lim

Publishing Editor
International Journal of Modern Physics D
email: ijmpd[AT]wspc.com

IJMPD Special Issue: 2012 Gravity Research Foundation (GRF) Essays

Dear Colleagues,

International Journal of Modern Physics D (IJMPD) takes great pleasure to announce that the 2012 Gravity Research Foundation (GRF) Essays are now published in the Special Issue: IJMPD Vol. 21, No. 11 (2012) http://www.worldscientific.com/toc/ijmpd/21/11

The contents, including the award-winning essays, selected honorable mention essays and invited papers, are free to read until May 2013.

If you find the articles to be of particular interest, we hope that you will circulate them with your colleagues and peers. We also welcome any comments and suggestions from you.

With best wishes,
Chee-Hok Lim

Publishing Editor
International Journal of Modern Physics D
email: ijmpd[AT]wspc.com

Invited papers from GR19 now free-to-read in Classical and Quantum Gravity

Selected articles from the 19th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation (GR19) are now published and free-to-read in Classical and Quantum Gravity (CQG). I invite you to browse the collection: http://iopscience.iop.org/0264-9381/28/11

The GR19 conference covered all of the broad range of subjects in the scope of CQG. Hyperspace readers are therefore certain to find high quality work in the issue relevant to their own interests.

I take this opportunity to thank all authors, referees and particularly the guest editors, Profs D Marolf and D Sudarsky for all of their hard work which contributed to making this outstanding special issue possible.

Yours sincerely

Adam Day
Publisher
Classical and Quantum Gravity
cqg[AT]iop.org

Read the 2010 CERN Winter School in Classical & Quantum Gravity

As a researcher with an interest in gravitational physics, we invite you to read the latest Classical & Quantum Gravity special section ‘Lectures from the CERN Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theory, CERN, 25 – 29 January 2010′.

The articles included within the special section are free to read online until 18 April 2011, and can be accessed by visiting http://herald.iop.org/link/4003

Please feel free to pass this message on to friends and colleagues.

Yours sincerely,

Adam Day
Publisher, Classical and Quantum Gravity
cqg@iop.org
iopscience.org/cqg

Read the Classical & Quantum Gravity GWDAW-14 Special Issue

You may be interested in reading the Classical & Quantum Gravity special issue featuring selected articles from the ‘The 14th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop’ (GWDAW-14), Rome, Italy, 26 – 29 January 2010.

The articles included within the special issue are free to read online until 22 March 2011, and can be accessed by visiting http://herald.iop.org/link/4002

You may also be interested to know that Journal of Physics Conference Series, the open access conference proceedings publication, has publish additional papers from this conference http://herald.iop.org/link/4004

Please feel free to mention this special issue to friends and colleagues.

Yours sincerely,

Adam Day
Publisher, Classical and Quantum Gravity
cqg@iop.org
www.iopscience.org/cqg

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CQG Highlights of 2009

The collection of Classical & Quantum Gravity’s Highlights of 2008–2009 is still free to read until 01 November 2010, and can be accessed through the following link: http://herald.iop.org/link/4001