9th TRR33 Winter School, Passo del Tonale, Italy

The school will cover topics relevant to the research subjects of the TRR33 network. The aim is to bring together observation and theory: “Theory for Observers and Observations for Theorists”.

Overview lectures:
David Mota, ITA – University of Oslo

In depth topics:
Observation of Large Scale Structure of the Universe: David Bacon, ICG Portsmouth
Non-linear evolution of Large Scale Structure: Diego Blas, CERN
Science Communication: Anais Rassat, EPFL Lausanne
Dark Matter: Pat Scott, Imperial College London
Beyond the LCDM model: Alessandra Silvestri, Lorentz Institute Leiden

Registration is OPEN: the deadline is 15th October 2015. To register, please visit our website:
http://darkuniverse.uni-hd.de/view/Main/WinterSchool15

Given the large number of applications we strongly suggest an early registration, well in advance of the deadline. Note that we will accept a maximum of 40 participants.

Please email us with any further questions at winter.school[AT]thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

Follow us on our Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/trr.winter.school
or on twitter using the hashtag #trr33tonale for announcements and reminders

Please check the homepage of the school for more information: http://darkuniverse.uni-hd.de/view/Main/WinterSchool14

See you in Tonale!
the Organizing Committee

Yashar Akrami,
Matteo Costanzi,
Matteo Martinelli,
Matteo Maturi,
Valeria Pettorino,
Georg Wolschin,
Miguel Zumalacárregui

WE-Heraeus International Winter School on Gravity and Light, Linz, Austria

With the generous support of the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation, 50 Scholarships are available for excellent physics and mathematics students (in their 4th or 5th year at university, but 3rd year undergraduates and beginning PhD students are equally considered) to participate in the

International Winter School on Gravity and Light in Linz/Austria, from 14 — 28 February 2015 which will take students from the basics to the research frontier:

Central lecture course on general relativity and light (30 hours)
F P Schuller (Institute for Quantum Gravity, Erlangen)

Lectures on gravitational lensing (5 hours)
M C Werner (Kavli IPMU Tokyo and Yukawa Institute)

Lectures on the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity (5 hours)
D Giulini (Hannover and ZARM)

Lectures on the cosmic microwave background
V Pettorino (Heidelberg and SISSA)

Lectures on gravitational waves (5 hours)
B F Schutz (Albert-Einstein-Institute and Cardiff)

IRAP PhD Winter School, Nice, France

The International Relativistic Astrophysics PhD (IRAP PhD) School in Nice will take place from the 23 of February to 2nd of March. It is specially devoted to frontier topics in relativistic astrophysics and to the students of the IRAP PhD Program. Students from the EMJD, CAPES, FAPERJ Programs will participate. The meeting is open to all interested scientists and graduate students.

The members of IOC are the following:
Giovanni Amelino-Camelia (“Sapienza” Università di Roma)
Vladimir Belinski (“Sapienza” Università di Roma and ICRANet)
Carlo Luciano Bianco(“Sapienza” Università di Roma and ICRANet)
Donato Bini (CNR – Ist. per Applicaz. del Calcolo “M. Picone”)
Sandip Kumar Chakrabarti (Indian Centre For Space Physics, India)
Pascal Chardonnet (Université de Savoie ) CO-CHAIRMAN
Christian Cherubini (Università “Campus Biomedico” di Roma)
Thibault Damour (Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques)
Jann Einasto (Tartu Observatory)
Simonetta Filippi (Università di Roma “Campus Biomedico” and ICRANet)
Sergio Frasca (“Sapienza” Università di Roma)
Filippo Frontera (Università di Ferrara)
Jean-Marc Gambaudo (Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis)
Yipeng Jing (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China)
Hagen Kleinert (Freie Universitat Berlin)
Olivier Legrand (Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis)
Francois Mignard (Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur)
Hermann Nicolai (Max Plank Institute for Gravitational Physics, Postdam)
Mario Novello (Brazilian Centre For Physics Research, Brazil)
Elène Politano (Ecole Doctorale Nice)
Kjell Rosquist (Stockolm University)
Jorge Rueda (SAPIENZA Università di Roma and ICRANet)
Remo Ruffini (“Sapienza” Università di Roma and ICRANet) CHAIRMAN
Felix Ryde (Stockholm University)
Farrokh Vakili (Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur)
Gregory Vereshchagin (SAPIENZA Università di Roma and ICRANet)
She-Sheng Xue (SAPIENZA Università di Roma and ICRANet)
Shuangnan Zhang (Institute of High Energy Physics – Chinese Academy of Science)

The web site of the School is on http://www.icranet.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=794. The major topics to be discussed are Neutron Stars and Black Holes, Gamma Ray Bursts, Supernovae, close binary systems, Active Galactic Nuclei, Cosmology, Dark Matter, strong fields in experiments on Earth and from space. Ample time for discussions will be granted.

In the period of the meeting many social events, including the famous carnival of Nice, will take place; therefore an early registration will be necessary for the accommodation.
Registration fees of 100 euros will be requested.

Fudan Winter School on Astrophysical Black Holes, Shanghai, China (2nd circular)

Black holes are very fascinating and peculiar objects. According to General Relativity, uncharged black holes are completely specified by only two parameters, the mass M and the spin angular momentum J. In the last 40 years, we have discovered at least two classes of astrophysical black hole candidates: stellar-mass objects in X-ray binary systems and super-massive black hole candidates at the center of every normal galaxy. The mass of these objects can be inferred by robust dynamical measurements, by studying the orbital motion of gas or individual stars around them. The determination of the spin J is much more difficult and it is a hot topic of contemporary astrophysics. Then, there are still many open questions: What is the origin of the jets produced in the region around these objects? How could super-massive black holes become so heavy? Are these objects the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity? All our open questions may be addressed by studying the properties of the electromagnetic radiation emitted in the accretion process and, hopefully in a not distant future, by observing the gravitational waves emitted by these systems.

This school consists of series of lectures on specific topics given by experts in the field and some short research talks. It is mainly intended for Master/PhD students and young postdocs working on high energy astrophysics, both for theorists and for observers. We plan also to arrange a few sessions for short presentations given by young participants.

Lecturers:

Tomaso Belloni (INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera)
Black Hole Binaries

Kostas Kokkotas (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen)
Gravitational Waves from Black Holes

Jean-Pierre Lasota (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris)
Black Hole Accretion Disks

James Steiner (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Measuring the Mass and the Spins of Black Holes

Feng Yuan (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory)
Formation mechanisms of outflows and jets

Organizers:
Cosimo Bambi (Fudan, Shanghai), Chair
Lingyao Kong (Fudan, Shanghai)
Zilong Li (Fudan, Shanghai)
Daniele Malafarina (Fudan, Shanghai)
Naoki Tsukamoto (Fudan, Shanghai)

Fudan Winter School on Astrophysical Black Holes, Shangai, China

Black holes are very fascinating and peculiar objects. According to General Relativity, uncharged black holes are completely specified by only two parameters, the mass M and the spin angular momentum J. In the last 40 years, we have discovered at least two classes of astrophysical black hole candidates: stellar-mass objects in X-ray binary systems and super-massive black hole candidates at the center of every normal galaxy. The mass of these objects can be inferred by robust dynamical measurements, by studying the orbital motion of gas or individual stars around them. The determination of the spin J is much more difficult and it is a hot topic of contemporary astrophysics. Then, there are still many open questions: What is the origin of the jets produced in the region around these objects? How could super-massive black holes become so heavy? Are these objects the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity? All our open questions may be addressed by studying the properties of the electromagnetic radiation emitted in the accretion process and, hopefully in a not distant future, by observing the gravitational waves emitted by these systems.

This school consists of series of lectures on specific topics given by experts in the field. It is mainly intended for PhD students and young postdocs working on high energy astrophysics, both for theorists and for observers.

Lecturers:

Tomaso Belloni (INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera)
Black Hole Binaries

Kostas Kokkotas (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen)
Gravitational Waves from Black Holes

Jean-Pierre Lasota (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris)
Black Hole Accretion Disks

James Steiner* (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Measuring the Mass and the Spins of Black Holes

Feng Yuan (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory)
Formation mechanisms of outflows and jets

* To be confirmed

Organizers:
Cosimo Bambi (Fudan, Shanghai), Chair
Lingyao Kong (Fudan, Shanghai)
Zilong Li (Fudan, Shanghai)
Daniele Malafarina (Fudan, Shanghai)